Nalini S. Mahadevan Joins Fluid Management Systems as General Counsel

10119450831161CDPNalini S. Mahadevan has been appointed as General Counsel for Fluid Management Systems, Inc. Ms. Mahadevan earned her JD from the St. Louis University School of Law and MBA from Washington University, St. Louis, MO. She was a partner at Lowenbaum Partnership and a founding partner at Mahadevan Law Office, LLC, both in St. Louis. She has over 10 years of experience in federal law. She is also an Adjunct Professor at St. Louis University School of Law.

Ms. Mahadevan will provide contract, licensing and legal services for Fluid Management Systems.

Fluid Management Systems is a high tech entrepreneurial company based in Lexington, Kentucky, USA. FMS is marketing a trademarked and patented product, VETrakTM, a proprietary system for managing inventory through a non-invasive measurement process. The initial focus is on food-animal feeding operations (AFO), such as swine and bovine markets. The products are also being developed for human health, pharmaceutical manufacturing, and medical dispensing cabinet for hospitals, clinics and AFOs.

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Fluid Management Systems Granted Utility Patent

photo 4On June 18th, the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) granted FMS a utility patent for a system that manages inventory through a non-invasive measurement process. USPTO also approved a trademark — VETrak — for commercial applications. FMS has several pending provisional and utility patents for human- and animal-health applications.

The measurement system developed by FMS is envisioned as a system to track injectable medications administered in hospitals, clinics and doctors’ offices. The technology resulting from this vision is highly adaptable; the first iteration of the technology will be implemented in the animal-health market.

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FMS is currently employing commercial VETrack units at swine farms in Illinois and Iowa. FMS is also in discussions with Lexington-based equine and pharma-manufacturing companies to expand the technology’s applicability to additional animal farms, as well as the human-health field.

Conceived, Developed and Written by Dr. Subodh Das and Tara Mahadevan

July 19, 2013

Fluid Management Systems

Copyright 2013   All rights Reserved by Fluid Management Systems, Inc.

www.fluidmanagementsystem.com     subodh@fluidmanagementsystem.com

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“Drug Makers’ Push into Injectables Could Ease Shortages” – Wall Street Journal, 26 March 2013

Healthcare and drug companies are looking to join a market largely held by hospitals: injectable drugs, a $7 billion industry that often experiences shortages.

Drug mogul Becton Dickinson (BD), for example, plans on introducing 20-30 new injectable medicines to the US over the next few years, some of which have been in short supply. International drug companies are also seizing the market. Jordan-based Hikma Pharmaceuticals will launch 5-10 products in the next few years, also introducing a few of which have been scarce.

Companies like BD are attracted to this market because of the supply issue; and while sterilizing injectable drugs can prove difficult, the payoff is big: almost one billion vials  are sold each year. However, companies might have to wait for the long-run, as producing sterile medicines can be expensive with low profits. Many companies left the market due to the cost, leaving some drugs to just one manufacturer. In addition, manufacturing problems, supply constraints and government investigation of manufacturing plants have pushed many drug firms to abandon facilities or slow down production.

What resulted was an even larger shortage in 2011: 183, as opposed to 23 five years earlier. According to the FDA, the shortages fell to 84 in 2012, partly because Pfizer began manufacturing limited cancer injectables and some plants, which were previously shut down, reopened.

Yet, in order to turn a profit, many companies are looking into raising prices by 10%. This would greatly affect hospitals and their drug buyers, who will most likely fight the increases. In order to cut costs and availability, drug companies should consider  producing and selling drugs in multi-dose vials. Fluid Management Systems, Inc. has the technology to manage and monitor injectable drug inventories in multi-dose vials.

Conceived, Developed and Written by Dr. Subodh Das and Tara Mahadevan

April 10, 2013

Fluid Management Systems

Copyright 2013   All rights Reserved by Fluid Management Systems, Inc.

www.fluidmanagementsystem.com     subodh@fluidmanagementsystem.com

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An Introductory to Fluid Management Systems

Founded in 2010, Fluid Management Systems, Inc. (FMS) is a high tech company based in Lexington, Kentucky. FMS has developed a patent-pending system for accurately managing liquid injectable medication inventory, called FMS SMARTray™. The heart of this system is a low-cost and highly accurate method for determining liquid levels inside several small to large enclosed vials/bottles, both simultaneously and instantaneously. Using our methods, we can track medication from the time it is ordered, to when it is delivered to a patient and added to their medical record, ending when a new order is placed; from there, the chain begins again.

The FMS SMARTray™ was envisioned as a system for tracking injectable antibiotics and vaccines administered on farms, and in veterinarians’ offices. FMS has chosen swine and cattle farms as the first market to serve.

However, in both human and animal pharmaceutical markets, liquid medications are provided in multi-dose vials. Currently, the management of vial inventories is manual, which is problematic: vial inventories are not directly tied to Electronic Medical Record supply chain systems. With its digitized system, the FMS SMARTray™ resolves this issue.

Through radio-frequency technology, our system is able to measure the amount of remaining fluid in a sealed container, while being non-invasive – medication vials are always sealed and sterile. Our system then maintains a database of important information about each medication vial. The motivation for our system is to control and monitor liquid medication usage; reduce waste; and automate the inventory and supply chain process – resulting in the elimination of all manual processes.

Conceived, Developed and Written by Dr. Subodh Das and Tara Mahadevan

October 26th, 2012

Fluid Management Systems

Copyright 2012   All rights Reserved by Fluid Management Systems, Inc.

www.fluidmanagementsystem.com     subodh@fluidmanagementsystem.com

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“Drought’s Grip Is Wide, Deep”- Wall Street Journal, 4 Sept 2012

Though Hurricane Isaac brought relief to one of our driest summers, the drought still has the capability of slowing our economy.

Farms have faced the brunt of repercussions, severely effecting corn and soybean crops, and increasing prices of feed for chickens, hogs and cattle. Many cattle ranchers and dairy farmers have found it cheaper to slaughter their livestock, which, in turn, affects food companies’ profit margins. According to the Department of Agriculture, food prices could climb 3% to 4% from 2012-13. Food prices rose from 2.5% to 3.5% in 2011-12.

Among other price increases is the growing cost of gasoline. Ethanol, a corn-based fuel that is mixed with gasoline, is a likely source of mounting gas prices. Gasoline prices are now around $3.78, having risen over 40 cents since July.

Regardless of the drought, farm incomes will grow 3.7% this year, to $122.2 billion. This is partly due to elevated prices of corn, soybeans and land, which are compensating for any losses. This, however, hasn’t widely stirred economic growth.

Recent rains cannot undo damages incurred, but may be able to facilitate next year’s soybean crop. Our current economic situation could worsen if moisture isn’t restored for next year’s growing season.

The question to answer: Will inflated food prices cause consumers to spend less on big ticket items, such as flat screen TVs and computers?

Conceived, Developed and Written by Dr. Subodh Das and Tara Mahadevan

October 10th, 2012

Fluid Management Systems

Copyright 2012   All rights Reserved by Fluid Management Systems, Inc.

www.fluidmanagementsystem.com     subodh@fluidmanagementsystem.com

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“How to Live High on the Hog During a Drought” – Wall Street Journal, 4 Sept 2012

Droughts can severely affect the lives of farm animals; livestock are often slaughtered if their living costs increase too rapidly. Farmers look at the situation economically, and sometimes selling an entire outfit makes more sense than continuing to run the show.

According to the National Climatic Data Center, 2012 has been the hottest year on record. Our summer was unfailingly warm; since June, corn prices have grown 41%, while soybean prices have grown 33%. On the same note, prices for hogs and cattle have dropped 19% and 8%.

There is a rise in the slaughter rate – the rate for hogs has shot up to 16%, when, at this time of year, the rate is usually 4-6%. The drought has raised livestock feed prices, persuading farmers to liquidate their assets.

In late 2007 and mid-2008, grain doubled in price, which pushed farmers into thinning their herds. The monthly average of slaughtered hogs increased to 10 million, from a steady rate of 8-9 million. However, the price of hogs recuperated in 2010-11.

The question to answer: how will our hand in climate change continue to affect the cost of food?

Conceived, Developed and Written by Dr. Subodh Das and Tara Mahadevan

October 10th, 2012

Fluid Management Systems

Copyright 2012   All rights Reserved by Fluid Management Systems, Inc.

www.fluidmanagementsystem.com     subodh@fluidmanagementsystem.com

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